About Wyoming

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Wyoming is the least populous U.S. state, with a U.S. Census population of 563,626 in 2010. This is a 14.1% increase since 2000. It is the tenth largest U.S. state by area. Cheyenne is the capital and the most populous city of Wyoming with a population of nearly 60,000 people within its city proper.

In 2002, more than six million people visited Wyoming’s national parks and monuments. The key tourist attractions in Wyoming include Grand Teton National Park, Yellowstone National Park, Devils Tower National Monument, Independence Rock (Wyoming) and Fossil Butte National Monument. Each year Yellowstone National Park, the world's first national park, receives three million visitors.

Historically, agriculture has been an important component of Wyoming’s economy. Its overall importance to the performance of Wyoming’s economy has waned. However, agriculture is still an essential part of Wyoming’s culture and lifestyle. More than 91% of land in Wyoming is classified as rural.

Economic Impacts of the Horse Industry are valued at approximately $286 million with an activity distribution as follows: • $46 million from Racing • $98 million from Showing • $77 million from Recreation • $64 million from other activities.

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Rodeo is big in Wyoming. Maybe it’s the Western culture that surrounds it, the history behind it or the no-holds-barred displays of courage and expertise, but rodeo is unlike any other sport and it is also about authentic Old Western spirit, camaraderie among competitors and raw emotion in the arena. Nowhere else can you truly witness the essence of Wyoming quite like this. Rodeo is a way of life and a profession for cowboys and cowgirls, who travel across the West making their living by bronc and bull riding, calf roping and barrel racing. It’s an occupation born in the days of the Wild West, when excellent horsemanship was a necessity on the ranch, as it still is in many places in Wyoming today. Back then, working cowboys would show off their riding and roping talents to one another, sometimes competing with neighboring outfits. Eventually, these get-togethers moved into towns as organized “bucking shows,” which gained popularity in part due to Buffalo Bill Cody’s traveling Wild West Show. 

Wyoming is home to one herd of wild horses which is located in the Pryor Mountains south of Billings along the Montana-Wyoming border. For more than a century, the Pryor Mountains have been home to free-roaming bands of wild horses.  The Pryor Mountain Wild Horse Range is unique in both its setting and for the wild horses that inhabit it. Many of the horses have primitive striping on their backs, withers, and legs and are reputed to be descendents of "colonial" Spanish horses. 

 
  Wyoming in Numbers:
img Horse Population: Approximately than 99,000
img Total Economic Impact: $286 million
img Population: 563,626
img Land area: 97,100 sq. miles
img Capital: Cheyenne
img Counties: 23
img Highest Point : Gannett Peak 13,809 feet
img Lowest Point: Belle Fourche River 3099 feet
img 10 largest Cities :
 
 
  • Cheyenne, 55,731
  • Casper: 51,738
  • Laramie: 26,050
  • Gillette 22,685
  • Rock Springs: 18,772
 
  • Sheridan: 16,333
  • Green River: 11,787
  • Evanston: 11,459
  • Rivertom: 9,430
  • Cody: 9,100
 

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